Some Types of Disabling Conditions the Social Security Administration Considers Eligible for Disability Benefits

The Social Security Administration (SSA), through its two large programs, provides financial benefits to America’s working group (whose jobs are covered by Social Security) and to certain individuals determined eligible by the SSA.

These financial benefits may take the form of any of the following:

  • Disability benefits – paid to employees who sustain total permanent disability, whether the injury or illness, which caused this disability, was work-related;
  • Retirement benefits – paid to employees who have retired from work (65 years old and above);
  • Benefits for spouses and/or other survivors of a family member who has passed – paid to widows and widowers (or divorced widows and widowers) and unmarried children under 18 years old (or up to 19 if child is attending full time an elementary or secondary school; and,
  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

The first three are paid to Social Security members through the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). Social Security members refer to employees who have earned SSA’s required number of credits via their monthly payment of SS taxes. Payment to these taxes are automatically deducted in employees’ monthly take home pay; this is entered in their payslip under the heading “FICA,” which stands for Federal Insurance Contributions Act.

The fourth (in the list above) is paid through the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. The recipients of SSI cash benefits include:

  • Disabled adults and disabled children (below 18 years old) who have limited income and resources; and,
  • People 65 years old or older who do not have any disability, but who meet the financial limits set under the federal benefit rate (FBR).

Employees or non-employees who wish to apply for cash benefits due to disability should understand that SSA approves only applications of those who have total permanent disability. Under SSA definition, a total permanent disability is a severe condition that:

  • Has lasted for about a year or is expected to last for at least a year;
  • Has resulted in the inability to perform any substantial gainful activity (in the case of disabled adults) or has resulted in severe functional limitations (in the case of children); and,
  • Can be expected to result in the disabled person’s death.

The SSA has prepared a list of disabilities which would make a person eligible for cash benefits if his/her condition would be found in the list. According to the Hankey Law Office, some types of disabling conditions that are found eligible for cash benefits under either the SSDI or SSI, include:

  • Cardiovascular system disorders
  • Digestive system disorders
  • Endocrine system disorders
  • Genitourinary impairments
  • Hematological disorders
  • Immune system disorders
  • Impairments that affect multiple body systems
  • Malignant neoplastic disease
  • Mental disorders
  • Musculoskeletal system disorders
  • Neurological disorders
  • Skin disorders
  • Special senses and speech disorders

People suffering from short-term disability will not be eligible to receive disability benefits from SS. However, for those whose disability is included in list above or in the list prepared by the SSA, or even those suffering from multiple health problems which render them incapable of performing any substantial gainful activity, it may be to their benefit if they would immediately seek the assistance of a highly-competent Social Security disability lawyer in their SS disability benefits application.